Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Luxury Goods Make You Selfish or The More You Have, The More You Want

The Devil Wears Prada? Effects of Exposure to Luxury Goods on Cognition and Decision Making

November 25, 2009

Paper Released:
November 2009

Roy Y.J. Chua and Xi Zou

Executive Summary:

Gandhi once wrote that "a certain degree of physical harmony and comfort is necessary, but above a certain level it becomes a hindrance instead of a help." This observation raises interesting questions for psychologists regarding the effects of luxury. What psychological consequences do luxury goods have on people? In this paper, the authors argue that luxury goods can activate the concept of self-interest and affect subsequent cognition. The argument involves two key premises: Luxury is intrinsically linked to self-interest, and exposure to luxury can activate related mental representations affecting cognition and decision-making. Two experiments showed that exposure to luxury led people to think more about themselves than others. Key concepts include:

  • Luxury does not necessarily induce people to be "nasty" toward others but rather causes them to be less concerned about or considerate toward others.
  • Experiment 1 showed that when primed with luxury, people are more likely to endorse self-interested business decisions (profit maximization), even at the expense of others.
  • Experiment 2 further demonstrated that exposure to luxury is likely to activate self-interest but not the tendency to harm others.
  • Exposure to luxury goods may activate a social norm that it is appropriate to pursue interests beyond a basic comfort level, even at the expense of others. It may be this activated social norm that affects people's judgment and decision-making.
  • Alternatively, exposure to luxury may directly increase people's personal desire, causing them to focus on their own benefits such as prioritizing profits over social responsibilities.

Read more.

No comments:

Post a Comment